Monday, September 12, 2016

Sprouted Wheat Bread - Phases 1 & 3

This bread is SO easy to make- just follow the tips I provide and you will have a loaf of homemade bread in no time!

Pro Tips:
-No sugar necessary! (sugar or honey is often used to proof the yeast. This step can be eliminated, it will just take longer to rise. Just ensure your yeast is not expired.)

-the oil for p3 is minimal. You don't need to count it per serving.

-for Phase 1, use a Phase 1 flour and use an extra egg white in place of the oil. Bake in a silicone pan

-when mixing the dough, put the ingredients in the bowl in order. You want to prevent the yeast from mixing directly with the vinegar.

- 2 packets of yeast is what the original recipe calls for

- as mentioned above, use a silicone loaf pan. Just remove bread from the pan after about 10 minutes- don't leave it longer or it will sweat and get soggy

- if you want to freeze this bread, let it cool, slice. Then lay slices on baking sheet, not touching, and freeze 2 hours. Then you can put the slices in a zip bag and they wont stick together.

- use only egg whites, no yolks!




Super Easy Bread

1 1/2 cups warm water (110 degrees)
2 packets of yeast
3 egg whites (for P1, 4 egg whites)
2 T olive oil (P3 only)
1 T xantham gum
1 1/2 tsp salt
3 cups FMD approved flour, phase specific (sprouted wheat works great!)
1 tsp vinegar

Heat oven to 150 degrees

Put everything in the bowl in the order listed. Mix for 5-8 with the paddle attachment if using a stand mixer. Scrape down the sides of the bowl if you need. Batter should be thick and smooth but too thick to pour. If you need to add water or flour to get to this, add it 1 T at a time.
Spread batter in loaf pan. Put pan in the oven and turn off the oven. Let it rise for 30-45 minutes, or until the batter reaches the top of the pan or just over. Remove pan, and heat oven again to 350 degrees. Bake bread for 35-40 minutes, until it looks firm and lightly brown on top. Let cool, remove from pan, slice when completely cool.

12 Phase 1 servings or 24 Phase 3 servings

23 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for this recipe! :)

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  2. Hi Carolyn - Will a regular baking pan work? I'll look for a silicon one, but until then...Mary

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    1. Yes you can use a regular loaf pan. Just grease it first

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  3. Can you sprout wheat and make your own sprouted wheat flour? Where do you buy sprouted wheat flour? Thanks!

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    1. While you CAN buy wheat berries and sprout them, dry them, grind them, they are not easy to find and it is labor intensive. I buy my sprouted wheat flour at Sprouts, or www.vitacost.com and there are other sites and stores that carry it.

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    2. I store wheat as part of my food storage and have a wheat grinder and dehydrator. So sprouting wheat is not a huge deal. You can find directions on the internet. I do it in larger batches. (Make sure you have screens for the dehydrator so the wheat berries don’t fall through). After drying the sprouted wheat, I grind in my wheat grinder, then freeze to keep it fresh. This is a lot less expensive and better quality then buying the flour in the store, but if you don’t already have these appliances, it would not be worth going out and buying them just for that. That is my 2 cents worth!

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  4. Would this work in a bread machine?

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    Replies
    1. I'm really not sure. I've never used a bread machine.

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  5. Carolyn, I've made this loaf twice. Both times the bread had a great crust but the loaf inside was wet. Second time making it I baked it longer and still same problem but not as bad. Can you tell me what I did wrong please? Using Canadian flour ingredients. Thanks

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  6. Baking times will depend on your pan, and oven. My pan is 9x15" so it takes less time. If you use a smaller pan, it will take longer to bake. You can use an instant read thermometer and when the inside is 190° to 200° it should be done. If the top browns too fast, cover it with foil

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Carolyn, my silicon pan was smaller. I'll try the instant read thermometer next time.

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    2. Is your "loaf" pan more like a cake pan, then? 9 x 15 sounds like a cake pan.

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  7. I used Haylie's recipe for my sprouted grain bread, but I had to modify it slightly because it calls for too much water.
    It kept being very soggy inside, until I found your blog and took it out of the pan after 20 minutes' cooking. Yesterday's loaf was near perfect, I came back here and realized I still kept it in the pan too long.
    Thanks for sharing the tip!!!

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  9. How long does this stay good for and do I keep it in the fridge or is it ok to leave out?

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  10. Replies
    1. The yeast you can get in the baking aisle.

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  11. I don’t have a paddle mixer. How long do I mix if mixing by hand?

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    1. You can use a hand mixer if you have one. By hand, mix it closer to the 8 minutes or more if you can

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  12. What would be the measurement for Active yeast, that is not in packets, but bulk?

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    Replies
    1. If it's in the jar, the label will give the measurement

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  13. What is the purpose of the egg whites/olive oil and the vinegar? Is it just for flavor, or does it do anything for the structure of the bread?

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    1. See all those little (and big holes) in my picture of my bread? The oil and egg whites help do that. I have a Peasant Bread recipe on the blog that doesnt use egg or oil and it is very dense bread. Very heavy.
      The vinegar softens the sprouted wheat. You can leave it out if you choose but from my experience, it is necessary.

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